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Easter Sermons, Augustine of Canterbury, and the Procession to the King of Kent

I preached my first Easter sermon this past Sunday, which was delightful. I hadn’t had the privilege of preaching on a holiday before (at least, not one of the big ones). Now that it’s over, I’m reflecting on the occasion. There are so many guests at churches on Easter. A lot of them have pretty … Continue reading Easter Sermons, Augustine of Canterbury, and the Procession to the King of Kent

What Did Jesus Write in the Dirt in John 8:1-11? Big Name Theologians Weigh In

While poking around some different articles on the treatment of women in Leviticus, I stumbled across some wacky interpretations of what Jesus wrote in the sand in John 8:1-11. Let me refresh your memory on that passage (with a verse from chapter 7 to make sure we don’t start in the middle of a sentence): … Continue reading What Did Jesus Write in the Dirt in John 8:1-11? Big Name Theologians Weigh In

Recovering the Sacred: C.S. Lewis, Philip Rieff, and the Cleveland Museum of Art

A while back I wrote about my visit to the Cleveland Museum of Art and my reaction to all of their Mary-oriented medieval art. Today, I want to think about the bigger journey that gallery was a part of. As I walked through the museum, it was wildly apparent that the artistic ideal of society … Continue reading Recovering the Sacred: C.S. Lewis, Philip Rieff, and the Cleveland Museum of Art

C.S. Lewis’s Nerdy Poetry: The Country of the Blind

Most of my experience with C.S. Lewis comes from those approachable classics that sit on many a Christian’s bookshelf: The Screwtape Letters, Mere Christianity, A Grief Observed, The Great Divorce and a few others. Only recently have I started to see the more academic, professorial side of him. Books like The Discarded Image: An Introduction … Continue reading C.S. Lewis’s Nerdy Poetry: The Country of the Blind

No Story Left Untold: The Miracula of Engelhard of Langheim

In the long and decorated history of Christianity, there are a few figures that are especially well remembered: Augustine, Calvin, Wesley, Luther, Cranmer, Chrysostom, etc.  These are the names on the “A-tier” of history.   After all, they’re founding figures of whole denominations.  Calvin’s systematic theology holds up Reformed thinking.  Luther’s boldness brought about the advent of Protestantism.  Chrysostom’s liturgy … Continue reading No Story Left Untold: The Miracula of Engelhard of Langheim

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